Author Topic: Can you recommend any other resources?  (Read 3442 times)

Angela

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1747
  • It's all good. 39 weeks...no sweat
    • View Profile
    • KeepEmCookin
Can you recommend any other resources?
« on: December 29, 2008 at 12:37 AM »
If anyone comes across any new information, studies, or treatments related to preterm birth, please reply to this topic. Please provide us with a link, and maybe tell us a little bit about why you found the information helpful.

Thanks everyone!

P.S. You can view additional articles about preterm labor and articles about bed rest at www.keepemcookin.com/news.aspx
« Last Edit: January 22, 2009 at 07:37 PM by Angela Davids »

Angela

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1747
  • It's all good. 39 weeks...no sweat
    • View Profile
    • KeepEmCookin
Why Every Week of Pregnancy Counts
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2008 at 01:51 PM »
This was just sent to me by our member mvp57. Thanks!

Source: Wall Street Journal, by Melinda Beck

Link to full article (requires online subscription):
http://online.wsj.com/article_email/SB122999215427128537-lMyQjAxMDI4MjI5MzkyOTMyWj.html#articleTabs=article

New Research Shows Why Every Week of Pregnancy Counts


This time of year, some hospitals see a small uptick in baby deliveries thanks to families eager to fit the blessed event in around holiday plans or in time to claim a tax deduction. Conventional wisdom has long held that inducing labor or having a Caesarean section a bit early posed little risk, since after 34 weeks gestation, all the baby has to do was grow.

But new research shows that those last weeks of pregnancy are more important than once thought for brain, lung and liver development. And there may be lasting consequences for babies born at 34 to 36 weeks, now called "late preterm."

New research shows that the last weeks of pregnancy are more important than once thought for brain, lung and liver development.

A study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology in October calculated that for each week a baby stayed in the womb between 32 and 39 weeks, there is a 23% decrease in problems such as respiratory distress, jaundice, seizures, temperature instability and brain hemorrhages.

A study of nearly 15,000 children in the Journal of Pediatrics in July found that those born between 32 and 36 weeks had lower reading and math scores in first grade than babies who went to full term. New research also suggests that late preterm infants are at higher risk for mild cognitive and behavioral problems and may have lower I.Q.s than those who go full term.

What's more, experts warn that a fetus's estimated age may be off by as much as two weeks either way, meaning that a baby thought to be 36 weeks along might be only 34.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the March of Dimes are now urging obstetricians not to deliver babies before 39 weeks unless there is a medical reason to do so.

"It's very important for people to realize that every week counts," says Lucky E. Jain, a professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine.

(This is only an article excerpt.)
« Last Edit: December 30, 2008 at 12:21 AM by Angela Davids »

KHart

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Can you recommend any other resources?
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2009 at 02:15 PM »
This was an interesting article that I found on Reuters  http://uk.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUKTRE50648L20090107 .   

Angela

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1747
  • It's all good. 39 weeks...no sweat
    • View Profile
    • KeepEmCookin
Re: Any other resources? (Study: education level and preterm birth)
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2009 at 10:53 PM »
KHart,
Welcome to the forum! Thanks for posting that article on the link between education level and preterm birth. Interesting stuff!

http://uk.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUKTRE50648L20090107